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Tips, Techniques, and Questions -- Technical questions or tips

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  #1  
Old 2019-11-10, 12:25pm
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Default Cleaning sterling silver

I have some lampwork & sterling silver items in a shop. I need to go and polish periodically. I normally use a polishing cloth, but that is tedious and time consuming. Any recommendations for quick cleaning/polishing products? Hoping for a dip and rinse process and am open to any other suggestions.
Thanks in advance!
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  #2  
Old 2019-11-12, 11:54pm
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Sorry Rudy but nothing jumps to mind.

I did subscribe to this thread to my list so I will get an email if someone comes up with an answer.
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  #3  
Old 2019-11-13, 11:43am
Bentley Bentley is offline
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Silver Dip is the easiest. Lots of suppliers sell it. I usually get mine at Rio Grande. If you have a lot you can tumble them. That cleans off the tarnish as well as gives them a beautiful polish. Use stainless steel shot with burnishing liquid (both from Rio Grande) and a drop of dish soap. It takes about an hour but you can turn it on and leave it. FYI I don't work for Rio haha.
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Old 2019-11-13, 7:53pm
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I did a little research and although it's not the fastest method, it's not the longest either. That method is the aluminum pan, baking soda and hot water. I will give it a try and report back.

I saw the "dipping" solution on Rio Grande but I didn't like the warning!!! Sounds pretty toxic.
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Old 2019-11-14, 9:35am
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Go as hot as you can with the water minimize the size of the setup if you can.

You can go to a smaller plastic bowl, a small sheet or two of aluminum foil and add the baking soda and the jewelry before pouring on the hot water.

Rumpling / scrunching the aluminum foil can give you more 'metal to metal' points of contact on larger things like flat wear or ear rings or other things that don't lay flat.

I have used this method for fine silver but I thought that sterling silver was made to not tarnish to begin with.
That's why I didn't think to suggest this method before.

You could use an aluminum foil pan to bring the water up to a good boil then add some scrunched foil to give you more metal to metal contact points.
Then put the jewelry in with tongs and add the baking soda.


Good Luck and let us know how well it works for you.
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Old 2019-11-18, 2:50pm
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Thanks so much! I have purchased a couple of aluminum pans and am anxious to try this method. I shall report back.
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Old 2019-11-19, 11:23am
Jenn L'Rhe Jenn L'Rhe is offline
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If lightly tarnished you can skip the aluminum and just make a loose paste of baking soda and warm water. I usually just do it in my hand and rub gently on the piece/pieces, rinse and pat dry. Neutralizes without removing a layer of silver like silver cleaner does.
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Old 2019-11-19, 4:51pm
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I finally did it, and I couldn't be happier. My 1st try was what I figured would be the easiest. I purchased a small aluminum dish. Added a couple of tablespoons of baking soda. Added the tarnished pieces of jewelry, and some self-made aluminum balls as added insurance. Finally added boiling water (about 1 cup). Stirred things around with a rubber spatula, and VUALA!!! One originally very tarnished piece needed a little polishing cloth action. Overall, extremely easy!!! Thank you to everyone who contributed.
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Old 2019-11-20, 3:13pm
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That’s awesome, Rudy!

I just want to add that if someone wants to tumble polish, use a barrel dedicated to the shot. Never use any abrasives in it.
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