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Tips, Techniques, and Questions -- Technical questions or tips

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  #1  
Old 2022-11-07, 9:46am
Cglass287 Cglass287 is offline
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Default Bail Biters - Handy Andy VS JAWS Donut

Good morning everyone!

Just discovered the forum and hoping to get some insight from other lampworkers before I buy a new set of bail biters.

I have been using Peters tweezers for a while now, and mine are getting wonky and becoming a real pain to use. Any clear bails I make end up with some black scuzz on the inside that I can't seem to avoid.

I have found a set of JAWS Donut tool which I am completely unfamiliar with, and some Handy Andy's which I have heard good things about.

Has anyone used the JAWS Donuts? (I cant post a link unfortunately as this is my first post on the board)

Anyone have any first hand comparison on these two, or which would be superior?

Thanks in advance!
Kyle
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  #2  
Old 2022-11-07, 10:25am
rcktscientist rcktscientist is offline
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I had the same issues and decided that in this case less tools is better. So, I now connect a rod to start the bail, then use shears to cut the rod length to size, then use tweezers to bend and form the bail. Finally, just blast with heat to melt in smooth and ream the hole to size.
I feel it takes about the same amount of time for me since Peter's and Andys both still needed the hole reamed to size to accept necklaces. I did primarily pendants.
I will say, however, that the JAWS tool looks pretty nice and sturdy.
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  #3  
Old 2022-11-08, 12:04pm
ESC ESC is offline
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I've never used the handy andy or the peters tweezer either one. I just use my tungsten pick to bore the hole and then ream it out.
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  #4  
Old 2022-11-11, 8:03am
Cglass287 Cglass287 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcktscientist View Post
I had the same issues and decided that in this case less tools is better. So, I now connect a rod to start the bail, then use shears to cut the rod length to size, then use tweezers to bend and form the bail. Finally, just blast with heat to melt in smooth and ream the hole to size.
I feel it takes about the same amount of time for me since Peter's and Andys both still needed the hole reamed to size to accept necklaces. I did primarily pendants.
I will say, however, that the JAWS tool looks pretty nice and sturdy.
Thanks Rckt, this is really exactly what I have ended up doing over the last week or two. I think this might be a better solution than paying another $100 for a tool when I can just improve on using this method!
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  #5  
Old 2022-11-11, 8:05am
Cglass287 Cglass287 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ESC View Post
I've never used the handy andy or the peters tweezer either one. I just use my tungsten pick to bore the hole and then ream it out.
I'll have to give it a shot, do you bore it by heating your pick while pushing through? Ive tried to use my Tungsten pick in this fashion in the past, but left a bunch of residue in the hole it punched (I wonder if I heated my pick too aggressively as it seemed to have a bit of a flaky texture afterwards, shedding some black junk)
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Old 2022-11-11, 8:58am
ESC ESC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cglass287 View Post
I'll have to give it a shot, do you bore it by heating your pick while pushing through? Ive tried to use my Tungsten pick in this fashion in the past, but left a bunch of residue in the hole it punched (I wonder if I heated my pick too aggressively as it seemed to have a bit of a flaky texture afterwards, shedding some black junk)
That is exactly the technique and if you're getting residue, lightly sand your pick before putting it to glass.
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  #7  
Old 2022-11-27, 1:33pm
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Frit Diva Frit Diva is offline
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Depending on what you are doing, you can also make your item at the end of a glass rod and then use a small spacer bead on a mandrel to form your bail. Stick together in the flame, then flame cut off the glass rod and anneal it on the mandrel. You may have to punty back and forth a bit depending on how you want it to attach, but the spacer-bead-as-bail is about the easiest way to make a bail that I've ever seen.
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  #8  
Old 2022-11-28, 2:48pm
ESC ESC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frit Diva View Post
Depending on what you are doing, you can also make your item at the end of a glass rod and then use a small spacer bead on a mandrel to form your bail. Stick together in the flame, then flame cut off the glass rod and anneal it on the mandrel. You may have to punty back and forth a bit depending on how you want it to attach, but the spacer-bead-as-bail is about the easiest way to make a bail that I've ever seen.
This is what I've been doing for icicles and really, I don't know why I tortured myself trying to make a bail any other way.
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