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Tips, Techniques, and Questions -- Technical questions or tips

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  #1  
Old 2024-01-29, 11:28am
danieljanse danieljanse is offline
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Default Let's make a 96 COE Reactive Ivory

Hello all, First post! I'm a man on a mission. I make glass (from scratch) and blow glass. I specialize with silver glass, making chalcedony and other silver bearing colors. About 10 years ago my sister, a lampwork artist, said I HAD to try IVORY due to its amazing reactions with silver. So, I bought some Reichenbach Ivory and got zilch in terms of reactions. Not the same chemistry, obviously. So what is the right chemistry?

Well I have been looking. I tried Vanilla Cream from Oceanside and learned how to fume with silver. I got some brown but nothing great. Probably similar to what I have read posted here.
Please see attached photo: left is a heavy fume and right is lighter and both are encased with clear glass.

The obvious questions:
Does anyone have any clues as to what is in the Reactive Ivories? Heard rumors? Guesses? LOL
Do they plate out in reduction suggesting they contain silver?
Do they cause copper to turn reddish suggesting the glass itself is reducing?
Do they react with lead based glasses?
Any interesting observations would be helpful. Thank you!
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  #2  
Old 2024-01-29, 11:59am
kevingreenbmx kevingreenbmx is offline
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Why don't you buy some and play with them? that will teach you a lot. CraftWEB is also probably a better forum to get help with something like this, all the old-hat batching and color chemistry experts are over there. Be humble when you post over there though... some of those dudes can be grumpy if they smell too much enthusiasm from someone who's not proven their capabilities through experimentation.
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  #3  
Old 2024-01-29, 12:17pm
danieljanse danieljanse is offline
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Haha! I have just placed some in my cart as I had the same thought. But I also figured why not ask the experts...artists who have been using the stuff for a long time and may have even spoken to folks familiar with the chemistry.

If all the 96COE artist has to work with is Vanilla Cream from OC then there is a lot of room for improvement.

As far as Craftweb...no thanks and no comment.
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  #4  
Old 2024-01-29, 12:59pm
kevingreenbmx kevingreenbmx is offline
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keep in mind that the control you have over how a color reacts in a bench torch flame is vastly different from working in a hot shop glory hole. The torch has a much broader range of flame chemistries available, so some glasses that do spectacular things on a torch are just bland when worked in a hot shop. That's particularly true if working from bar or re-melting cullet, some reactive colors will only produce their best colors in the hot shop when gathered straight from the pot in the first melt from batch.

but absolutely experiment, there is always more cool stuff to be found.
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  #5  
Old 2024-01-29, 6:38pm
danieljanse danieljanse is offline
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I was using a Nortel Midrange when I did the fuming I showed so I should be able to explore a variety of flame chemistries if I can develop the right glass.

There was a call for it on here: "Do you want a COE 96 reactive ivory?" Thread number 209643 (I'm too new to post a link). That seemed to die with a whimper when Vanilla Cream was released...just not the same as Ivory. It's funny just looking at the cane in the catalog...Ivory wants to get webby...untreated! Vanilla doesn't do that. I've got a 12" square sheet and it's plain off-white throughout.
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  #6  
Old 2024-01-30, 10:16am
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Three Muses Glass Three Muses Glass is offline
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Don't know if this will help but Bullseye glass (90 coe) French Vanilla contains sulfur and selenium. It does have a strong reaction with fine silver. Fusing FV with silver tends to a much better reaction than torching it, then it can get muddy brown, very unlike Effetre Ivory or Dark Ivory. I don't remember ever fuming the Bullseye FV.
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  #7  
Old 2024-02-01, 9:48am
danieljanse danieljanse is offline
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Thanks, Rebecca. I have seen some nice fused glass work combining silver and BE French Vanilla (90) and I believe those reactions are cloned into OC Vanilla Cream (96). But as you point out...nothing like Effetri Ivory. A true mystery!

To get something like Ivory in the hands of the 96 COE artist is what I'm hoping for...especially these hands! LOL
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  #8  
Old 2024-02-01, 10:57am
kevingreenbmx kevingreenbmx is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danieljanse View Post
Thanks, Rebecca. I have seen some nice fused glass work combining silver and BE French Vanilla (90) and I believe those reactions are cloned into OC Vanilla Cream (96). But as you point out...nothing like Effetri Ivory. A true mystery!

To get something like Ivory in the hands of the 96 COE artist is what I'm hoping for...especially these hands! LOL
Buy enough of the 104 color you like to fill your crucible and add more silica to it to lower the expansion down. A decent cook should homogenize it pretty well, the 104 glasses are known to have a ton of flux in them. Once it's cooked in, you can then pull a gather into ~4mm rod and do a hagey seal test with the clear you are trying to fit to see if you have it matched. If the expansion is still too high, add in more silica sand. If you overshoot (try and go slow so you don't), you can bring it back some with soda or potash.
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