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Tips, Techniques, and Questions -- Technical questions or tips

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  #1  
Old 2014-07-04, 12:50pm
Floorkasp Floorkasp is offline
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Default Open glass structure, any tips?

I have seen several amazing pieces of 3D boro glass sculpture made of fairly thin glass rods. They are made in boro, and I would love to know more about this technique.

Here is a link to an example: http://www.emilywilliamssculpture.co...ure.jpg?dc5d59

I would like to have a try, first small, but then maybe bigger. I want to try it out now, as I am thinking of getting a bigger kiln. If this technique suits me, it could be a reason for going bigger with the kiln..... So far, I have mostly been making beads and some marbles.

So anyone who has worked like this....any advice is very welcome! Including books, videos, tutorials......
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  #2  
Old 2014-07-04, 3:15pm
2xMI 2xMI is offline
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She recommends Bandhu Scott Dunham's book(s) "Contemporary Lampworking: A Practical Guide To Shaping Glass in the Flame". I recommend it, as well. I just got the first two volumes, and it is a great resource. She says flame annealing can be done with a hand torch, but she prefers a kiln for her intricate sculptures, and recommends kiln annealing for everything.

Have fun with this and please post pictures!

Mimi
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  #3  
Old 2014-07-05, 3:30am
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steiconi steiconi is offline
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Nighthawk posted a tutorial for Spun glass recently; it's not quite the same, but probably works in a similar way. http://lampworketc.com/forums/showth...highlight=boro
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  #4  
Old 2014-07-05, 4:48am
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We did this on a smaller scale (bracelets) in a class and we used a Little Torch. I was a fail. My boro kept cracking at my joints.
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  #5  
Old 2014-07-05, 1:25pm
Floorkasp Floorkasp is offline
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Thanks everyone. I just noticed that Emily Williams, whose piece I linked to, has put quite a bit of information on het website. http://www.emilywilliamssculpture.co...ate-glass-art/

Some great advice there.
The pieces she makes are actually a lot bigger than I first thought.

I made my first little boro spun 'blob'. I quite like it, and it was pretty easy to do. It is about 2 inches wide. Onwards and upwards!

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  #6  
Old 2014-07-05, 1:57pm
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Nice work! You might also enjoy the glass chain maille jewelry that Kim Edwards makes-- the little rings are tiny!

Mimi
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  #7  
Old 2014-07-05, 2:01pm
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I have met Kim Edwards and seen her work up close. It is amazing! She participated in the Flame Off at the Tucson show early this year. It was fascinating to see her do the very detailed and intricate work, while other were working big and bold.
The amount of attention to detail and precision she displays is far beyond my reach. I am making a big chainmaille type glass scarf. Still chainmaille, but no comparison.
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  #8  
Old 2014-07-05, 3:21pm
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So glad you got to see her work and her making it, too. It's something to work towards, isn't it? And please post pics of your chain maille!
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  #9  
Old 2014-07-05, 6:55pm
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There are also a lot of videos available to rent on smartflix.com

I'm not sure if there is one on this particular technique. But when I can't find something on You tube, I go look there. I have rented a few boro tutorial videos from them. It's a lot like netflix.
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  #10  
Old 2014-07-09, 3:05am
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Ah, I was getting all exited about the great videos on Smartflix.....to then find out they do not ship to the Netherlands. Too bad.
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  #11  
Old 2014-07-09, 4:21am
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Default Glass Crochet, Weaving, Spun Glass



Q: How do you get to Carnegie Hall from here? A: Practice.

To make the loop the glass must be the right temperature.
The right time to do it is to hesitate until the glass just loses its glow from the fire, then form the loop. You can just roll the glass between your fingers.
First slightly back away from you, then back towards you. I stretch it just a bit as I'm rolling it in my fingers. If the temperature is right it will form the loop.

You need to use a relatively sharp and small flame for this. Large flame large loop, small flame small loop.
Make sure the parts are welded to each other after making the loop.
You have to do this weld quickly or the loop will melt away.

Just like crochet, there are many different styles for making objects.
This is one of the basics.

If you wish to make a circular pattern. Form a "Maria" ( a flat disc) on the end of a rod. You can then add rows around it.

Hint: The bending point of any glass is just below the melting point.

Have fun!

Last edited by hyperT; 2014-07-09 at 4:58am. Reason: Add Info
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  #12  
Old 2014-07-09, 4:52am
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Default Maybe One Day



You will make one of these too.
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  #13  
Old 2014-07-09, 8:12am
Floorkasp Floorkasp is offline
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Thanks! Not quite the same, but very interesting.
And I guess that my next step after the blob will indeed be the ship.
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  #14  
Old 2014-07-09, 8:19am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Floorkasp View Post
Thanks! Not quite the same, but very interesting.
And I guess that my next step after the blob will indeed be the ship.
Ha Ha Ha yeah go for it!!!!
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  #15  
Old 2014-07-10, 5:24am
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The problem with any pieces like these are that they can be very delicate and fragile. As such the completed piece must be handled with care.
Even the piece that Emily made.

The trick here is to make sure the parts are fused together.
Granted the borosilicate glasses are very forgiving, but we still must take
some reasonable care.
Some of the spun glass artists merely tack the parts together making the piece even more fragile.
I use a 4mm to 5mm rod to crochet with. I have seen guys use 1/2 inch (12.7mm) rods to do it with.
I would suggest a larger flame to stretch the parts but fuse them together in a tiny flame.
As for me, I use a National 3A Blowpipe with a number 3 torch tip when I make do my glass crochet.
You may have seen the Italian glassblowers use these in videos.
This is a very versatile torch.
I have made boro serpentine dragons over 2 feet long on this torch and use it for almost anything I make. Doubtless it takes practice.


Close up photos can really distort things LOL.
hyperT: Assistant director in directory assistance department of redundancy department.
Have fun.
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  #16  
Old 2014-07-10, 9:20am
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104 COE glass is actually much more durable than 33 in this type of work, once you actually get the thing made. Boro is harder, but more rigid, and for these type pieces flex is very important. It's harder to make things with soft glass, though, because of its tendency to explode from thermal shock.
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  #17  
Old 2014-07-17, 1:44am
Nighthawk Nighthawk is offline
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If you take a small rod and make the tip flat,you can use that to attach and pull from. It is hard to teach but you pull out like 4 times longer than a loop pull.It dont matter where you place it back as long as its next to your last pull. you will get the effect you are looking for i believe. You look like your close but you are overlaping too much. Next time i get to the torch ill see about posting a picture of what im trying to get across(even if its not to well)
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