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Tips, Techniques, and Questions -- Technical questions or tips

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  #1  
Old 2018-05-10, 8:02pm
jsknow4445 jsknow4445 is offline
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Default Anyone using Bullseye 90 coe?

Because I do a lot of fused glass with Bullseye I wanted to use their rods to make components like leaves, twisties etc. that can be included in my kiln work. Being so inexperienced with lampwork in general - it has been really interesting playing with both 104 and 90. With 90 being much stiffer and it also seems more brittle and prone to cracking - I am curious to know if it is commonly used for bead making? In some situations perhaps having a stiffer glass is helpful?

Thanks June
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  #2  
Old 2018-05-10, 8:15pm
della della is offline
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To tell you the truth, when I first started using Bullseye (for making beads), I never even thought about any other use of that glass. I had never heard of fusing. It was a wonder to actually get real pinks and purples from glass rods. I am hoarding a big stash of Bullseye. Beads made from Bullseye were a really big deal. Every few weeks (months?) they would debut new colors. There was mad scramble to order it. People would lurk, stalking the site. I used to drive to Portland just to buy the new stuff. Many times, there was not enough to meet the demand. Remember that you old dogs? It was so much fun.
As for it being brittle or stiff, you just got used to slight changes in the way you worked the glass. It was not a problem.
della

Last edited by della; 2018-05-10 at 8:17pm. Reason: more
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  #3  
Old 2018-05-10, 8:38pm
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That is all that Stephanie Sersich uses. Here is a video of her teaching at Corning if you're interested. You can google her and see lots of examples of her work.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zP0c3i2zqwU
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  #4  
Old 2018-05-11, 1:58am
jsknow4445 jsknow4445 is offline
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That is really interesting Della. Supplies are getting back to normal now after the big air quality mess but we were all hoarding our stash for a while there. There doesn't seem to be much new color development these days other than what was necessary to meet new standards. It's a fun change of direction to use a torch on this glass - instant results, instead of waiting hours for kiln firing.
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  #5  
Old 2018-05-11, 2:03am
jsknow4445 jsknow4445 is offline
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Thank you for link Eileen - love watching talented lampworkers at torch. Certainly have heard the name before but didn't realize she used Bullseye.
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  #6  
Old 2018-05-17, 12:57pm
28676bhe 28676bhe is offline
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Try annealing your glass if you're cutting it into strips to fire in a torch for beads before using. i usually use 1000, hold 10, AFAP down to 900, hold 20, 100 dph to 700, off.
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Last edited by 28676bhe; 2018-05-19 at 1:09pm.
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  #7  
Old 2018-05-18, 5:40am
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MagpieGlass MagpieGlass is online now
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Like you jsknow445 ... I started fusing before lampworking and have always been a huge BE fan.

Still most of my beads are made with 90 (I also work 104 and 33). The more recently manufacturered rods do seem to be hellaciously more shocky than in the past. Bullseye is stiffer and most of their glass is translucent instead of opaque which I prefer.

My newer cane/rod that wants to constantly blow up on me I shove in my kiln to preheat the end for a bit. Same can be done with cut strips (I've been using those for colors no longer pulled to cane: Deep Red, Striking Pink, Violet Striker, transparent Gold Purple).
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  #8  
Old 2018-05-19, 2:40pm
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FosterFire FosterFire is offline
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I started beadmaking on Bullseye. I only went to Moretti (104) after a Leah Fairbanks class. I have many pounds of Bullseye that will be finding a new home eventually.
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  #9  
Old 2018-05-20, 4:13am
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Moira Moira is offline
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I use BE in the torch to make components to add to my pate de verre. But for beads I use 96 or 104 - it's cheaper, and comes in a huge range of colours.

Also - you can't use Double Helix with BE, which would be a dreadful loss!
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  #10  
Old 2018-05-20, 7:16am
jsknow4445 jsknow4445 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 28676bhe View Post
Try annealing your glass if you're cutting it into strips to fire in a torch for beads before using. i usually use 1000, hold 10, AFAP down to 900, hold 20, 100 dph to 700, off.
Thank you - that's a good tip. I have not tried strips yet just rods but was thinking of trying it to see if I like it.
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  #11  
Old 2018-05-20, 7:24am
jsknow4445 jsknow4445 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moira View Post
I use BE in the torch to make components to add to my pate de verre. But for beads I use 96 or 104 - it's cheaper, and comes in a huge range of colours.

Also - you can't use Double Helix with BE, which would be a dreadful loss!
I have a pate de verre class coming up in October at AAE glass with Alicia Lomne. I have always admired that process - looking forward to learning more.
Evelyn Gottschall Baker is also teaching "A non-traditional approach to pate de verre" there in Jan.

I love the look of the silver glasses but I have zero experience with them and the cost makes me reluctant to try - but I do have a sampler pack of DH colors that I should experiment with. Do have favorite tutorials that use DH?

June

Last edited by jsknow4445; 2018-05-20 at 7:27am.
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  #12  
Old 2018-05-20, 7:30am
jsknow4445 jsknow4445 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FosterFire View Post
I started beadmaking on Bullseye. I only went to Moretti (104) after a Leah Fairbanks class. I have many pounds of Bullseye that will be finding a new home eventually.
Leah is a favorite artist of mine - so yes I would have done the same! Keep me in mind if you decide to detash you 90 glass, I would be interested.

Thanks June
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  #13  
Old 2018-05-20, 7:34am
jsknow4445 jsknow4445 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MagpieGlass View Post
Like you jsknow445 ... I started fusing before lampworking and have always been a huge BE fan.

Still most of my beads are made with 90 (I also work 104 and 33). The more recently manufacturered rods do seem to be hellaciously more shocky than in the past. Bullseye is stiffer and most of their glass is translucent instead of opaque which I prefer.

My newer cane/rod that wants to constantly blow up on me I shove in my kiln to preheat the end for a bit. Same can be done with cut strips (I've been using those for colors no longer pulled to cane: Deep Red, Striking Pink, Violet Striker, transparent Gold Purple).
Good suggestion - I will try preheating in the kiln - I was thinking it might get too hot to touch if I had the annealing program running?
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  #14  
Old 2018-05-23, 3:20pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsknow4445 View Post
I have a pate de verre class coming up in October at AAE glass with Alicia Lomne. I have always admired that process - looking forward to learning more.
Evelyn Gottschall Baker is also teaching "A non-traditional approach to pate de verre" there in Jan.

I love the look of the silver glasses but I have zero experience with them and the cost makes me reluctant to try - but I do have a sampler pack of DH colors that I should experiment with. Do have favorite tutorials that use DH?

June
It was Alicia's class in England a few years ago that got me started! i was so keen, I went with my arm in a sling having broken my collar bone about a week before! She is a brilliant teacher (even for the one-armed!).

Silver glass is addictive, once you get the hang of it. The tutorials and links on the DH website are a great start; and I have a tutorial by Anouk Jasperse - she's very good. When I started, I used it as stringer a lot, to eke it out. Moira
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  #15  
Old 2018-05-24, 2:04pm
Katia Katia is offline
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jsknow4445, I had the same idea some time ago and discovered a whole new world. But at that time I bought HH torch because I had no idea if I like it or not. I had some BE 90 and tried to melt firepolished stripes on HH - well, as far as I remember I ran out of gas before a 10mm (less than 1/2") bead was rounded. It was a moment when I decided to switch at least to Minor and try again, but COE 104 world offered its opportunities and I am still investigating it.

I would suggest that you go further and not only anneal but firepolish your strips in advance for a number of reasons. First - when we score and break strips we may have sharp edges. Even with 2mm thins. And it is not the best thing to have your fingers injured when you are making your the very best thing. Second - you can grind the edges but it is not always good for hot glass - there is a chance to get scum and other impurities (just like from scratched rods). If you firepolish and wash your strips (to remove any residue from kiln wash or paper) in advance, you will have nice "bars" of annealed glass. Аnd one more thing - you can prepare your dichro in the kiln - 2mm (thin) transparent on top of dichro side, tack fuse, anneal and you have your dichro covered, with nice edges and secured from burning off. Thre are so many dichro colors and textures in COE 90 - love it
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  #16  
Old 2018-05-25, 5:22am
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MagpieGlass MagpieGlass is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FosterFire View Post
I started beadmaking on Bullseye. I only went to Moretti (104) after a Leah Fairbanks class. I have many pounds of Bullseye that will be finding a new home eventually.
I'm gonna start stalking you

(joke)
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