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Studio -- Show us your studio setup

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  #1  
Old 2014-06-08, 4:00pm
kenzkatz kenzkatz is offline
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Exclamation HELP!!! im a beginner!

I'm new to all of this but I'm already in love with it. All I ask if for you all to help gather a list of absolutely everything I'll need for my own first studio. I'm leaning towards to Bethlehem bravo torch wise. As far as kilns I have been looking at the AF1313 - 240 volt on Arrowsprings.com (do i need a 240 volt or is the 120 just fine?). As for tools and glass I have created a cart on Mountainglass.com.
I'm just still not sure I know enough about what I'll need to be safe like certain hoses? Flashback receptors? I'm clueless but I want the best I can find.

A personal email where I can ask more questions to an experienced lampworker would be greatly appreciated as well.

& thank you!
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  #2  
Old 2014-06-08, 4:10pm
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CaitieJ CaitieJ is offline
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Hi Kenzkatz,
I'm new too, just introduced myself today, but gave some tips. Go to the Safety thread here on LE. It's really helpful and will save you from making mistakes in setting up that others have made and learned from. It helped me so much. Also until you can afford all your equipment you can save a lot by repurposing 2nd hand items. I've made my own glass storage, rod rests and even a cheap light box this way. When in doubt, ask. There's not many questions that you won't find the answer to here on LE. Just remember to add an asterix * to any words less than four letters when using the search function.
Welcome to the addiction!
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  #3  
Old 2014-06-08, 4:20pm
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echeveria echeveria is offline
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Will you be doing soft or boro? Beads, marbles, sculptural, pipes, etc? Hard to say what you need without knowing what you aim to do, since they are all a little different.
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  #4  
Old 2014-06-08, 5:32pm
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Croft Eeusk Croft Eeusk is offline
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Oh, lord. I don't think anyone can give you a complete list. Even folks who have been doing this for years still find lot of things they 'need'.

It really also depends, as said above, on what you're wanting to make. I'd avoid expensive silver glasses until you have some torch time under your belt.

It sounds like you're going the right direction if you're starting to make lists. Also there are a lot of companies that supply the glass addicted. Some may have minimum amount before you can order; usually $50-100.

http://www.cgbeads.com/index.htm Donna - bead rollers
http://www.frantzartglass.com/ Franz - glass, tools, etc.
http://www.creationismessy.com/sitemap.aspx CiM - glass manufacturer; also tips on how to get the best results from their glass
http://www.devardiglass.com/supplies.htm glass manufacturere - some folks like it others hate it; good tools
http://www.artcoinc.com/alllampworking.php ARTCO - tools
http://www.cattwalk.com/ CattWalk - presses, marvers etc.


The list is endless

DJ
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Last edited by Croft Eeusk; 2014-06-09 at 7:42am.
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  #5  
Old 2014-06-08, 6:16pm
beckd beckd is offline
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Do yourself a huge favor and buy a " Glass Hive Kiln". If you want the best-this is the kiln to get !
Good Luck
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  #6  
Old 2014-06-10, 7:59am
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Baywinger Baywinger is offline
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I too recommend the glass hive kiln, a 120 kiln is fine unless you need a large kiln though as a beginner that is unlikely. Bethlehems are great torches I just upgraded too a champion and it is a wonderful torch, if you want to make marbles the best marble mold on the planet is the infinite rim mold the 5 in 1 is the best one to start with.
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  #7  
Old 2014-06-25, 1:27am
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Speedslug Speedslug is offline
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Kenzkatz, start with the very basics.

Torch, gas, oxygen.

Glass is a consumable and you will always be getting more glass so pass on that for the moment.

Safety: Eye protection, ventilation, work surface that can cope with gooey hot glass at 2300 degrees.

Glass stresses if it not cooled down slowly and some kinds even explode if cooled or heated too fast. Glass bits can fly some dozen feet and still be hot enough to start a fire so a tiled floor is best but you could also make a box over your work area to keep things contained.

The kind of stuff you want to do with molten glass will guide the kinds of glass you work with. Large sculptural work wants to be boro because it puts up with cooling in the air while you work (to a point). But if you use boro you will need eye protection that can handle the brighter light it gives off when in the flame.

How is your budget? I work "soft glass" (coe 104) because it is among the less expensive types of glass but it needs to be put in a kiln to control how it cools.

How big a kiln you get depends on how big you work is. I get by just fine on 115 vac kiln with less that a cubic foot of space in it.

Some folks do just fine with a 2 foot by 3 foot sheet of metal under a torch, a camp stove size bottle of gas and a hot head torch and make wonderful stuff for decades. Some needle nose pliers and some plumbers wool to keep the glass from cooling too fast and a friend with a kiln to "batch anneal" once a month and box fan in a window in front of the torch along with a pair of ACE eye glasses and maybe the head of a hammer to use as marver and they are set for life.

Happy hunting and pay attention to the safety stuff.
These gases are good for breathing.
You only get one pair of eyes.
Oh and house fires caused by glass work can be a reason for your insurance company to tell you they are not going to pay your claim.
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Last edited by Speedslug; 2014-06-25 at 1:29am.
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  #8  
Old 2014-06-25, 4:03am
Hammer Hammer is offline
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The Bravo is a great choice and will take some time to outgrow. I also recommend a Glass Hive Kiln to start. The inside dimension of mine is 18 x 11 x 7 and still is only requires a standard 120V outlet.
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  #9  
Old 2014-07-31, 2:04pm
MoonDropsbyCindy MoonDropsbyCindy is offline
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Newbie here, too! All of the strands I have read make me feel quite inadequate! My beads are lopsided and I only have a table in the garage for a "studio." BUT I LOVE DOING THIS!

This is what I decided on for my initial set up:


(729) 729 - Tools - Rod Cutter with Two Round Cutting Wheels

(167 1678 - Flameworking - Shaping Tools - Set of 12

(2677) 2677 Glass Shears - 7 inch - 3 inch blade - Gold Handles

(EX10) EX10 - Oxygen Concentrators - EX-10

(1654-45) Moretti Starter Pack - 45 pc

(T02625) Moretti/Effetre Transparent - Light Teal - .25 LBS

(T03625) Moretti/Effetre Transparent - Dark Aquamarine - .25 LBS

(T012) Effetre / Moretti Light Amber- Lt Topaz .25lb

(T06425) T06425 - Moretti/Effetre Transparent - Black - .25 LBS

(P264) P264 --Effetre / Moretti Pastels-- P264 Ivory 1 Pound

(T07225) Moretti/Effetre Transparent - Orange (Striking) - .25 LBS

(T012) Effetre / Moretti Light Amber- Lt Topaz .25lb

(T07625) T076 - Moretti/Effetre Transparent - Red (Striking) - .25 LBS

(T0041401) Effetre / Moretti Clear 13-14 mm 1lb

(5628STUPS) Blue Bird kiln (UPS)

(71267) Book - Creating Glass Beads 71267

(4MinorOxy) Kit #4 with the Minor Burner Torch without Oxy Reg

REB11 1 X REB11 - Gas Equipment - Regulator - Fuel

T124S 1 X T124 - Gas Equipment - Twin Hose Set - 1/4'' Diameter
(T254) (Hose length: 25 foot)

1501 1 X Gas Spark Lighter - 1501

1600Bundle139 1 X Minor Burner Torch



Any comments would be most welcomed. I have called the propane company to put in a 100# tank.

Cindy
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  #10  
Old 2014-07-31, 10:02pm
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MelanieG MelanieG is offline
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I would recommend that you not make a significant investment until you've tried lots of different things and have an idea where you want this trip to take you.

A Bethlehem Bravo, for instance, is way more torch than a beginner needs if they are planning to work in soft glass. I would start on a hot head or a small torch like a Cricket or a Nortel Minor, and then trade that in and move up if you decide you want to work bigger and hotter. If you are planning to work in Boro, I'm not sure what the best starter setup is.

If you are planning to do soft glass, this is my list of absolute necessities. This can be built out as you find your feet and develop a specific direction and set of 'need to trys'.
  1. Torch (Hot Head, Nortel Minor, Cricket, MiniCC - keep it small to start with)
  2. Kiln - Paragon SC2 or Glass Hive Regular Guy
  3. Kiln Rack (unless the kiln has a contraption built in)
  4. Oxygen Concentrator - 5LPM (unless you decide to start with a hot head, then you can skip this for now)
  5. Glass. I cannot overemphasize how important it is to not overdo this. Buy only what you need, and make yourself use it up practicing. Experience all of the colours you want to try, but do it gradually. If you don't do it this way, you will end up with an accumulation of stuff you don't want, and you will feel tremendous guilt whenever you do buy new glass because of the giant glass millstone already hanging around your neck.
  6. Tweezers
  7. 3"x4" Graphite Marver
  8. Graphite Marver Plate
  9. Mandrels (3/32" or bigger - it's too easy to melt through the skinny ones for a beginner, and it's a sort of puzzling/terrifying experience)
  10. Fusion Bead Release
  11. Barbecue Mashers
  12. Inexpensive set of steel sculpting tools
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  #11  
Old 2014-08-01, 6:58am
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getdul981 getdul981 is offline
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The tweezers Melanie refers to are not your typical eyebrow tweezers. Get at least 8 inch and preferrably 12 inch ones.
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  #12  
Old 2014-08-01, 9:56am
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I like how Melanie mentioned the glass guilt. Good advice to make yourself use what you have. Tool guilt is my current thing, be creative and hit the Goodwill!
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  #13  
Old 2014-08-02, 1:55pm
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Lisi Lisi is offline
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Start with a Hothead. If I could go back 12 years and do this all over again, I would not change a single thing about the way I learned. Hothead with 1lb Mapp canisters for one month, then a switch to bulk propylene 30lb tanks (from welding shop) for the next 17 months. Then I changed to an oxygen generator and my torch was a Mini CC first, and then a Bobcat. More heat than the HH and that was good, but there are still some things I prefer to do with the Hothead because sometimes my Bobcat is just too hot.
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  #14  
Old 2014-08-03, 8:32am
LarryC LarryC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisi View Post
Start with a Hothead. If I could go back 12 years and do this all over again, I would not change a single thing about the way I learned. Hothead with 1lb Mapp canisters for one month, then a switch to bulk propylene 30lb tanks (from welding shop) for the next 17 months. Then I changed to an oxygen generator and my torch was a Mini CC first, and then a Bobcat. More heat than the HH and that was good, but there are still some things I prefer to do with the Hothead because sometimes my Bobcat is just too hot.
For beginners I would skip the hothead entirely as it is a serious handicap. I would also skip the starter torches like the minor or mini CC as those dont have good resale value and tend to be a poor investment. I would suggest you take the time to do lots of research and buy the best you can when you know what you want. With a multi stage torch you can use the center fire initially and grow into the rest and not have to buy again for a very long time if at all. Been using a Mirage for more than two years and I dont see myself upgrading in the near future. Anyone with a little guidance should be able to jump into the Lynx right away without trouble.
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  #15  
Old 2014-08-21, 5:08pm
Burnthands Burnthands is offline
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I wouldn't worry about a 100lb propane tank for soft glass. If you're just using a minor or the alpha center in the bravo a 20lb bbq tank will last a long time, at least a couple weeks. or a 30lb rv tank is still manageable when it's full, hundred pounders are a pain.
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