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  #1  
Old 2013-09-17, 8:12pm
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queenofswords queenofswords is offline
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Default Got my new Phantom

I got my new phantom torch. What a learning curve from my national. I did love my national mind you. Okay, any secrets or advice from those of you using a Phantom?
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  #2  
Old 2013-09-17, 8:17pm
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shawnette shawnette is offline
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Clean it after each use.
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Old 2013-09-17, 8:28pm
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Raimond Raimond is offline
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I am still learning to use mine but what I do is light it as normal, then add just enough of the top oxygen to stabilize the flame, leave the candles long. Then add the main oxygen to get the flame you want...

Someone with lots more experience will chime in and add more info... Fingers crossed...


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  #4  
Old 2013-09-18, 7:40am
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Start by familiarizing yourself with the centerfire before messing with the outerfire.

To light your torch, open the centerfire gas and light it. Dial in a yellow flame about 6" long, or so, and then add your green valve oxygen and just crack open your blue valve oxygen. Adjust your flame with the red and green. Having the blue valve cracked open creates a little movement at the end of the injector tubes and keeps them from becoming dead spots that attract heat and carbon. You can open your outerfire green oxygen a little to stabilize the centerfire flame, if you want to. I do.

Pay attention to your candles. They will tell you your flame chemistry. A neutral flame will have blue candles with yellow/white tips on the end. Those tips will be somewhat rounded. The more fuel-rich the flame is, the more they will feather out and streak and the longer they will become. The longer the blue part, the longer the tip can be and the flame still be neutral. For candles that are about 3/8" in length, the tips will be about 1-2mm long. When you run a small flame, you will want the tips to be smaller (the flame will be more oxygen-rich). If you run a small flame that has candles 1/4" in length or shorter, you will want them to be all blue with no white/yellow tips. When you run a neutral flame, you do not need to clean your torch often, if at all. While you are first getting used to it, it isn't a bad idea to clean it and check for carboning. If you find a lot of carbon, then use more oxygen in your flame.

When you are ready to play with the flame settings, know that when using the red and green valves, the flame is just like any other surface mix torch (which is still different from your premix). This kind of flame will have a lot of radiant heat. Employing the triple mix feature using the injector oxygen (controlled by the blue valve) will draw the radiant heat back into the flame. You can increase the injector oxygen while decreasing the regular oxygen and change the shape of the flame. If you want to small, pinpoint flame, you can dial one in that is about the size of a darning needle using the red and blue valves, only. Because the radiant heat is pulled into the flame, it makes it a very hot pinpoint flame and it is comfortable to work with your fingers close to the flame and it doesn't wipe out details in glass next to where the flame is directed.

My suggestion is to play with the torch and familiarize yourself with what the valves do before putting glass in front of it.
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  #5  
Old 2013-09-18, 6:29pm
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queenofswords queenofswords is offline
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Thank you so much. I watched the you tube on how to use it but it gave no where near the information you have. I really appreciate this.

Donna
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