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Studio -- Show us your studio setup

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  #1  
Old 2013-08-07, 9:53am
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Default Question Regarding Work Table

Hi there,

I'm in the process of starting up a little work area and I have a question regarding the work table, which is wood, and what should go on top of it.

Hubby and I were originally thinking a stainless steel square drilled or nailed onto the top of the table would make a good base, and it's fairly cheap BUT when we were at the glass supply store the man working behind the counter suggested cement board because it's cheap and easy to find.

Is there really a difference? I would think stainless steel would be better though I really don't know why. What are your thoughts?

Thanks!
Carol
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  #2  
Old 2013-08-07, 11:15am
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Lorraine Chandler Lorraine Chandler is offline
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I use the metal sheets from Home depot, I can bend them and cove them up the back side of bench for a backsplash etc. Hot glass booboos do not leave ulgy burn marks and stinky smell when they hit the metal, it also wipes clean of teensy tiny glass fragments with a damp towel.
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  #3  
Old 2013-08-07, 11:21am
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I am trying to choose between cement board, stainless sheet metal, or cheap-o marble tiles. I'm leaning towards the stainless option; no dust, easy to clean, no spaces between tiles for glass bits to hide. Plus, I think it looks more professional, though that doesn't matter too much in my studio.
I'm looking forward to more opinions!
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  #4  
Old 2013-08-07, 11:36am
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So from what it sounds like stainless is the best. I didn't know that cement board can stink if it burns. I would think a smooth tile would work too but maybe after the time you spent cementing it, grouting it, etc. then you might as well have gone for the stainless.
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  #5  
Old 2013-08-07, 1:56pm
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Using a material that is thinner than cement board. Some call it ceramic board.

A sheet of this on top of the table plus some 12 x 12 inch tiles that are not cemented to the board or grouted. Find that using a small shop vac takes care of any issues with dust or frit in the cracks. i.e. the tiles are pushed tight together.

The best part is that it is easy to take apart and light to move and a cost saving over a custom made SS table top cover.
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  #6  
Old 2013-08-07, 2:31pm
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my work surface is covered in 4"x 4" ceramic tile (came with the bench). i actually like the grout lines as they help stop rods rolling across the bench. I usually use a shop vac. if I had to do it again, i think i would still stick with tile, but maybe larger.
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  #7  
Old 2013-08-07, 2:51pm
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So then the tiles sound good too. I can see what you mean about the grout lines - how they help keep the stuff on the table under control. It's little things like that you don't really think about when planning it out but it does make sense.

This thread deserves the Kool-Aid guy because I have been dying to use that emoticon since I joined the forum. LOL
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  #8  
Old 2013-08-07, 3:38pm
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I have 12x12 tile on my work area and the area that is directly under my torch is covered by a 12x20 metal sheet. The tile is affixed to 1/2 in plywood which you can buy precut at Home Depot.
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  #9  
Old 2013-08-07, 3:53pm
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My bench is a 2 inch slab of wood with a metal frame covered by a 1/4 inch thick piece of aluminum plate. It's 3 feet deep and 6 feet long. The plate holds up well to any pieces that drop and doesn't get hot at all.
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  #10  
Old 2013-08-08, 8:53am
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Sounds like a lot of this boils down to personal preference. Thank goodness all of this is available at the local Home Depot / hardware store. Is there anything that I should absolutely stay away from? I'm thinking any kind of wood/laminate surface is a big no-no but other than that anything else?
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  #11  
Old 2013-08-09, 1:01pm
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I use a sheet of metal from Home Depot, duct-taped to the edges of the table. Make sure you either round off or cover the corners of the metal, so you don't bump into them and gouge yourself. I don't have the area right around the torch duct-taped because bad things happen to duct tape when you lay a hot graphite paddle on it.

I also have a cookie sheet with a dark finish on it covering the area in front of the torch, because I think it's easier to see my flame against a dark surface. Dark ceramic tiles would work, too, although I wonder whether you might not want a glossy surface there. I haven't tried tiles, so I couldn't say for sure.
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  #12  
Old 2013-08-09, 5:03pm
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The thicker cement board is dusty and little bits of glass can get stuck in it. Sheet metal is cheap and easy!


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  #13  
Old 2013-08-09, 6:14pm
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I also painted a black "lane", about 4" wide, from my torch all the way up the wall so as to better see the flame. I used high temp paint, the kind used to repaint a BBQ. It has held up better than I thought, as I just painted directly over clean tile and stainless steel (did no other prep, such as scuffing the surface). So far, there are no nicks, scratches or "burns" and yes, I have dropped molten glass on the paint many times.
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  #14  
Old 2013-08-10, 7:50pm
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Well hubby and I just got back from Home Depot with four 18" x 18" tiles. They fit my table perfectly! We also picked up a small rubberized rug pad that prevents slipping. The idea is that we are going to lay down the rug pad on top of the table and then just plop the tile right on top. The tile probably doesn't even need anything underneath them, they are heavy enough, but just to make sure we are adding the sticky padding.

Thank you all for the ideas! Once I get the area set up I'll post a pick, probably within a week or two.

Blessings!
Carol
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  #15  
Old 2013-08-10, 10:28pm
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I used 12x12 tiles on the work tables in my studio.

This is brilliant~

Quote:
Originally Posted by AmorphousDesigns View Post
I also painted a black "lane", about 4" wide, from my torch all the way up the wall so as to better see the flame. I used high temp paint, the kind used to repaint a BBQ. It has held up better than I thought, as I just painted directly over clean tile and stainless steel (did no other prep, such as scuffing the surface). So far, there are no nicks, scratches or "burns" and yes, I have dropped molten glass on the paint many times.
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  #16  
Old 2013-08-11, 11:24am
Lampwork49 Lampwork49 is offline
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You could also go to a Costco or Sams Club or similar place and buy 4' metal workbench. It has a stainless steel top and a shelf underneath. light weight so easy to move and very affordable!!!!
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  #17  
Old 2013-09-18, 7:04am
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i found an old stainless steel surgical table at a garage sale, thats working well
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  #18  
Old 2013-09-23, 8:33pm
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I covered mine with roof flashing.
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  #19  
Old 2013-09-23, 9:24pm
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I have an old laminate countertop that I put legs on. It has a stainless steel sheet under the torch. I threw a dark sheet of stained glass (because it was laying around) behind the torch so I could see the flame. I also have a 12" white ceramic tile to my right with rod rests so I can clearly see glass colours against it when they are out.

Love the paint idea.

Will the rubber backing singe and stink when glass bits get between the tiles?
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  #20  
Old 2013-09-24, 7:08am
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I just changed my workspace last weekend. I have always had one of those plastic resin tables, but it used to have aluminum foil all over and marble cutting boards in my immediate workspace. Now I have black plastic puck board all over the table, and still the marble tiles on my work space. The wall behind my torch has a rectangle of steel screwed to it as a heat shield for the wall, not that it's really ever been needed. Cement board would probably be easier, but I hate the texture, and I can marver on the marble.
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  #21  
Old 2013-10-14, 9:59pm
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  #22  
Old 2013-10-17, 7:48am
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Just curious, in setting up your work space are you giving consideration to ventilation?
I am assuming your work table is intended for your torch area, right?
The one most important consideration is ventilation.
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  #23  
Old 2013-10-17, 1:01pm
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My point is not to use cement board, because it not cleans easily and always leaves powder. also it is quite thick and in the edges may gather - stack rods. as you can see in the foto I used 2 pieces of metal, the small is stainless steel and the larger is aluminum, both at thickness almost 0- 3⁄64in (1 mm). You can clean them easily and remove them time to time for reorganigation your table room.
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  #24  
Old 2013-10-21, 8:08am
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I use a piece of sheet metal, painted black with stove paint. Directly under my torch is my graphite marver and a lane of ceramic fire brick also painted black. They make great rod rests and are excellent insulators.
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Old 2013-10-24, 9:02am
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Cement board with a large sheet metal sheet under the torch. I like it because I can clean up really easily. Vacuum and wipe down.
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Old 2013-11-14, 1:02am
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I like the idea of cutting a sheet of cement board to fit over the top of the desk and then covering it with sheet metal. I would cover the whole top of the desk with the metal though because, as has been stated, cement board will deteriorate over time and can get dusty and a hot rod will leave burn marks making it kind of ugly.

My lampwork bench is a framed out table built to my desired dimensions (8 ft. long) with a custom made concrete "counter top". I have it sanded and polished smooth as a marble counter. Easy to clean and impossible to burn with a hot rod. Very easy to do if your husband is up for it.
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