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  #1  
Old 2006-10-01, 7:31am
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Default Tie-Dyed Bead

In my addiction to YouTube, I found this video on how to make a tie-dyed bead. Wanted to share the link with you guys.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acVmVUG4_xk
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  #2  
Old 2006-10-01, 8:33am
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That was great!! Unfortunately I got stuck looking at OTHER YouTube stuff. Yikes.... I could spend days in there...... Must torch now......
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Old 2006-10-01, 8:37am
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Cool, thanks!!!

Love,
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  #4  
Old 2006-10-01, 8:57am
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Thats great...I just started watching utube with my daughter she watches all the Japanese animaes...I never thought they would have lampworking demos....thanks...
Denise
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  #5  
Old 2006-10-01, 9:04am
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He's got 4 different videos up
And they are all easy to follow and nice videos for anyone wanting to see it being done, from advanced to beginner.
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- SJS Glasswork & Creations
Exploring a philosophical fantasy world.
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  #6  
Old 2006-10-01, 1:00pm
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Yes I liked it. The one that was really dark I finially figured out. Duh moment. But really great. Thanks for the link.
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  #7  
Old 2006-10-01, 1:02pm
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Thanks for sharing this!
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Old 2006-10-03, 5:27pm
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Default A question

Anyone know who he is?
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  #9  
Old 2006-10-04, 6:16am
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Thanx for the video Ross.
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  #10  
Old 2006-10-07, 7:24am
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Ross posts often over on WC (screen name Nightcat). He teaches lampwork too, in his hometown.
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  #11  
Old 2006-10-07, 12:58pm
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What a great site- Thanks!!!
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  #12  
Old 2006-10-07, 4:47pm
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Beth,
I saw those too, and didn't think to post for others. 50 lashes for me and 50 hugs for you.
Margie
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My name is Margie...and I'm addicted to glass...no...to fire...no...to glass...no...
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  #13  
Old 2006-10-08, 4:35am
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Those are really great video's.

It's fantastic that someone takes the time to place those good instruction movies on the net.

My compliments for HotGlass!!!!

I have place the link also on our Dutch Glass Forum;

http://glashobby.forumup.nl
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  #14  
Old 2006-10-08, 1:09pm
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I've watched all of his videos, and I think it's awesome that he has taken the time to do these... I would have LOVED to have had something like this to watch when I first got started....however I have 2 pieces of constructive criticism related to the making of the beads.... and to the TEACHING of techniques to new lampworkers.

1..his technique looks a little sloppy and inexact..in otherwords, if someone wants to reproduce a bead repeatedly, they need reference points for volume and size, etc. This reflects back on the "exactness" of his beads. If you look at his dotted/masked beads ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDymND7nRtE ) tutorial you'll see what I mean. He never talks about "dividing the bead up "mentally" into sections or quadrants for the dots.....that's important when making a geometric bead. AS is the need for dots of consistent size!

2... he does a lot of "lumping" and gross remelting of his beads.... And the result of that seems to be that his resulting beads (like the lapis blue flower bead http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FU3W2SkEHV8 ) end up LOOKING a little sloppy. If I were learning it would make me think that it is "ok" to leave a bead looking like that...

The reasons for those constructive criticisms is not to downplay the importance of what he has done, (indeed many people charge a lot of money so that you can learn basic techniques) but if you are GOING to teach, I think it's important that the student be able to replicate a decent product in a near perfect manner. A Geometric bead NEEDS to be at least mentally measured (the masked dot tut) to come out looking geometric and beautiful. That isn't mentioned, nor is the need to make your dots of uniform sizes!

ON that note check out Susan Corbetts Artists in Residence Beadmaking Videos! They're AWESOME too....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sDuOF...elated&search= BTW She also doesn't mention volume or spacing, but hers ARE more accurate when complete......

Also, just an editorial reflection/question. Does EVERYONE heat up their mandrel that much? I run my mandrel thru the flame enough to heat it, but NOT to make it red hot like he does. What do YOU guys do? My glass sticks just fine the way I do it, and my mandrels last forever!
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Last edited by danelady; 2006-10-08 at 1:34pm.
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  #15  
Old 2006-10-12, 5:30am
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I agree Lynnie,
His technique is a little sloppy.
I think it's important to use a good technique when making beads as the results in the end are much nicer, and when teaching it's even more important.

For example making a basic disk, that thing was all over the place. Yes he ended up with a round (well sort of round) bead in the end, but even if the style was a messy tye dye look, when teaching you should still teach a good technique of applying glass to the rod. No matter what the design. Oh and he never even preheated the rods, one even snapped and broke. Yikes!

and....when taking the bead out of the flame it's important to keep turning the bead while it cools. Anyone knows if you stop it's going to droop. He should have got his technique for taping the video down before presenting it to the world.

But other than that. Kudos to him for at least posting his video.
The linke for the women that you posted Lynnie, she had better technique applying the glass to the bead making a nice base bead, however her application of dots I agree lacked in technique.

I know, I know I shouldn't criticize I wouldn't normally but if you're teaching people you should be a bit better at what you do. but it's not like people are paying for it so no big deal? That's debateable.
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  #16  
Old 2006-10-12, 10:43am
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It's probably tough to make a bead with time constraints (The video's gotta be HUGE if he took all the time he wanted to make it perfect) and with a camera on wheels between you and the torch. I appreciate that 'point of view', rather than watching from the side or opposite the artist.

He probably wants to do it as quick as possible so he doesn't have to do editing later...

I found his videos valuable for someone who hadn't seen lampwork before to get 'basics' down. This is a mandrel, this is a twistie... etc.

Last edited by ellyloo; 2006-10-12 at 10:49am.
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  #17  
Old 2006-10-13, 10:50am
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He showed a few tricks I tried immediatly myself and they worked out great for me. I find his video's a great inspiration.

He takes the time to make this video's from a view we can really see what he is doing. All the others who say it can be done better don't make any video.

In the Netherlands we has a saying: you must not take a look in a mouth of a given horse (excuse me for my English)
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  #18  
Old 2006-10-13, 12:46pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by margriet@stainedglass.nl
He showed a few tricks I tried immediatly myself and they worked out great for me. I find his video's a great inspiration.

He takes the time to make this video's from a view we can really see what he is doing. All the others who say it can be done better don't make any video.

In the Netherlands we has a saying: you must not take a look in a mouth of a given horse (excuse me for my English)
I agree!

There is certainly more than one way to make a bead and if it comes out ok in the end then who cares if he is not fussy about every step.

Keep in mind that he is doing multiple things at once.

I could certainly identify with rods cracking and beads drooping - it was kind of fun to watch for those reasons in particular and see how he recovers from those little mishaps. Also to be able to see the timing is useful; how long does it take to make a twistie? and then to complete the bead? also note how quickly a bead can droop if it is not spun continually. Lots of good, almost subliminal, info there.

Anyway, I seriously doubt that there would be any adverse consequences to the unsuspecting novice from viewing these videos. Who in the world lives in such a vacuum that the only exposure to beadmaking would be those videos?

Plus it is free.
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  #19  
Old 2006-10-14, 2:59pm
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Hey! I thought he looked familiar and then I saw where someone mentioned his name, Ross. Yep, that's him. He was in a class I took at the Eugene School of Glass. I don't go to WC much anymore but I remember he has mentioned on WC that he was interested in teaching...looks like he found a way to do that. Good for him!
J
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  #20  
Old 2006-10-15, 4:37am
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Teaching the recovery from mishaps is great and it IS wonderful that he took the time to make the videos to help others... but YES there possibly could be adverse consequences to a learning lampworker after viewing the videos, I feel.

Here is why. When TEACHING someone new, we want to assure Success. To do that, we need to assure that they understand the need for a correct method / technique for creating a bead properly... Uniformity perhaps? Anyone watching those videos, who didn't have access to a forum such as this, might ASSUME that his finished product is the "standard" to which they are working to achieve. It really isn't, it is a step ON THE WAY.

That is my ONLY problem with the videos. And again it isn't "looking a gift horse in the mouth" as Margriet was eloquently paraphrasing. It is looking at the subject with realistic expectations.

I frequently tell my dog training students to read EVERY book on dog training, bad, good or indiffererent, because even from a poor technique or badly written book you can learn SOMETHING (even if it is what NOT to do!). I feel that way about Lampworking as well.

In this case, I would rather have to teach CORRECT technique to a student than have to UN TEACH poor practices. However, that said, People will learn quite a few things both good and maybe not quite so good from watching (as you pointed out, catching and fixing a droop) these videos. Better yet, would have been to demonstrate and EXPLAIN the proper way to maintain a round bead and prevent the droop, see?

Anyway I again am NOT trying to run down his kind attempts, just to point out that his methods of teaching need a bit of refinement if he is to reach his goal of teaching lampworkers to make a consistently great looking bead.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lbjvg
I agree!

There is certainly more than one way to make a bead and if it comes out ok in the end then who cares if he is not fussy about every step.

Keep in mind that he is doing multiple things at once.

I could certainly identify with rods cracking and beads drooping - it was kind of fun to watch for those reasons in particular and see how he recovers from those little mishaps. Also to be able to see the timing is useful; how long does it take to make a twistie? and then to complete the bead? also note how quickly a bead can droop if it is not spun continually. Lots of good, almost subliminal, info there.

Anyway, I seriously doubt that there would be any adverse consequences to the unsuspecting novice from viewing these videos. Who in the world lives in such a vacuum that the only exposure to beadmaking would be those videos?

Plus it is free.
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  #21  
Old 2006-10-20, 4:53am
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I loved his videos. I thought for someone doing them with a rolling camera and an open flame they were great. I thought the point to the videos was having them done in under a specific amount of time.

If someone has more questions or their beads don't come out to their expectations they can either pay for lessons, ask questions at a store or forum, or try new things. I don't think it takes a lot to figure out how to divide dots on a bead, at least not to get started. Then there is plenty of info out there.

But then I don't know who has decided some of the various standards we are supposed to strive for in the perfect bead. Sometimes I think it is because everyone just fell in line and no one said, hey wait, this is fine too. In other words why do some people push the limits for the sake of art and others are sub-standard? (Rhetoric question, I don't want to hijack this thread.)
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Old 2006-10-21, 1:40am
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As you become more experienced at any craft, you learn the need for exactitude and preciseness... they lead to perfection in creation. Anything else is just "making do" or poor copying. As to "standards, we each set our OWN, but aiming for anything but the "best possible " falls short (in my opinion). The point in teaching is to help the student aim for perfection. No we aren't perfect and never will be, but don't those GORGEOUS pieces out there make you want to aspire to that?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Nancy
I loved his videos. I thought for someone doing them with a rolling camera and an open flame they were great. I thought the point to the videos was having them done in under a specific amount of time.

If someone has more questions or their beads don't come out to their expectations they can either pay for lessons, ask questions at a store or forum, or try new things. I don't think it takes a lot to figure out how to divide dots on a bead, at least not to get started. Then there is plenty of info out there.

But then I don't know who has decided some of the various standards we are supposed to strive for in the perfect bead. Sometimes I think it is because everyone just fell in line and no one said, hey wait, this is fine too. In other words why do some people push the limits for the sake of art and others are sub-standard? (Rhetoric question, I don't want to hijack this thread.)
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Last edited by danelady; 2006-10-21 at 1:42am.
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  #23  
Old 2006-10-21, 6:57am
Just Nancy Just Nancy is offline
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You just said it yourself. As you become more experienced you aim for......
I think everyone's desire for perfection will be different. Especially depending on what your experience is. For someone interested in achieving a color effect, how he puts glass on a mandrel in under 90 seconds, doesn't impact how they make their bead. I absolutely love this video, for the concept. I can be as exact as I choose from there.

For a beginner I think anything they can get their hands on is great. Some will aspire to be exact some not. Do I want to aspire for perfection? No. Actually. I aspire for a visually pleasing piece. I don't think it has to be perfect for it to be so. In fact I was just having this discussion with a newbie bead maker who thought she might quit before having anything perfect enough to show the world. I got out my collection of beads from big artists. They look very visually pleasing but most have a flaw if you look.

As for the perfect way to put the glass on the mandrel, different things work for different people. Same as how to place dots, etc. I do'nt see the need to be critical of the videos. Nor for example do I see the need to be critical if someone chooses to leave chill marks on their bead. Sometimes it adds a subtle texture they personally like. If asked, I would answer that those are chill marks, how they are made and that most people feel it should be fire polished out of their beads.
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Old 2006-10-21, 7:21am
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Hmm well personal choice is one thing... many new lampworkers are learning this art not only to enjoy it, but to eventually earn a living at it. If theyaren't taught, for instance, how important removing chill marks is 'as it is very important to most discerning bead artists' (our customers) the new artisan may be frustrated early on for lack of understanding as to why their beads don't sell.

I thought the point of my whole discussion early on was very clear. Of COURSE it is really nice that he is making these videos and offering them for free... but the concept he is offering, a truly correct detailed floral or masked bead within a 10 minute time frame, is not only impossible, but makes for frustration for a new person who THINKS it is.... You can continue to sing the praises of a short tutorial, it's free, has the basics, etc, but I think the second artist mentioned, who chose to create 2 videos to make one bead was more realistic.

OK, I'm out of this discussion, it's been fun and I really DID appreciate your sharing those videos Hulagirl, THANK YOU!
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Old 2006-10-23, 4:36pm
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No matter how nice you are some one WILL come along and kick you square in the head! It's OK, I've been kicked harder.

I do these for fun, I do them for free and I never ever make any claims about being an expert. They are just demo's that I make 100% on my own, that means solo, with my iSight camera mounted on a skateboard. It ain't as easy as it looks folks.

I would welcome other beadmakers to share their homemade videos. Do it in the spirit of sharing, do it in the spirit of community building, do it for fun and do it for FREE! Do it without fear of the finger waggers and the poo pooers. Do it because you CAN!

Let's build a fun and welcoming flameworking community on youtube. Let's show them that Crafter & Artists have something to give. Let's be a little bit smart in that sea of stupidity.

Show me how it should be done, come on!!

So, this is Lampwork Etc... Interesting place.

Later,
Ross~NightCat~hotglass

Oh Yeah, Thank-You to all the folks who said nice things. I appreciate it. I have been upgraded to a "Director" which means I can make videos longer than 10 minute and I have some new editing software so hopefully my productions will improve a bit. Not much though.. gotta keep my edge don't ya know..
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Old 2006-10-23, 4:58pm
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That was great...It's great to see someone demonstrate...Really helps with the explanation (not just words)...I might give this a try...

Thanks for sharing...
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Old 2006-10-23, 5:00pm
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Yeah. I'll be watching for new productions.

I thought it was worth every bit of the time it took my dial up to download it.
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Old 2006-10-23, 5:11pm
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Just a side note, I purposely dont make nice perfect nice discs as a base for cane and frit beads, I make a nice footprint, and build a odd crazy wonky bead for a purpose. Yes it takes more time to finish the bead but it makes the patterns more interesting when I melt it down and into a round bead.

If you make a nice perfect disc and just squiggle the cane on it would not melt down into as interesting of a bead as it does when you make it kind of a odd squiggley disc. By making the disc an odd shape it gives the cane more places to go and move different ways to go when melting it down into a round bead.
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  #29  
Old 2006-10-23, 6:18pm
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Hey NightCat,
I have decided to come out of "lurking" mode for the very first time to say thank you for posting your demos. I am a beginning lampworker (officially one month now) and appreciate ALL the help I can get. Reading the books and taking lessons does not assure you great success (I am living proof of that!). A visual is always very helpful to understand how to undertake any project and I am very happy you put yourself out there to share techniques I have not seen before. I think beginners thrive on new ideas and techniques and it is what keeps me coming back to the torch day after day. Practice and perseverance has allowed me to finally achieve what I set out to do...... HAVE FUN ! ! !

Suzanne
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  #30  
Old 2006-10-24, 10:23am
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I just wanted to pop back in for a moment to say Hi to tt4st. Thanks for de-lurking. Ukiacat - yep that's me. Your florals are awesome!

I think the critiques put forth in this thread are accurate and should be kept in mind while watching my flameworking videos. I will strive for less "slop" but I am only willing to go so far. I take the criticism as intended, as constructive. I really want thank the folks who watched them that close, that is a compliment and That Rocks!! At least you weren't instantly bored, always a good sign.

When I started, I made a decision to just "Git-R-Done" in 10 minutes. That is the length limit that YouTube imposes on new users and about as large a file as folks want to deal with. That decision forced me to sort of slam the beads together. This is an ongoing experiment for me - What can I do, and how far can I push this format?? I have no interest in replacing quality hands on instruction.

When I am doing these videos I am thinking along the lines of "Iron Chef", where you go from raw material to meal in one hour. Not "Emeril Live" where every dish is already done and waiting in the wings and all he has to do "live" are the showy bits. Iron Chef, as a show, is always risking disaster and it is FUN. Are you going to become an expert Chef by watching Iron Chef? Probably not. Is their food as good as it would be if they had all day in their own kitchens? No.

Some of you may be surprised at how long you spend on one bead. Try an experiment, get your rods ready and set a timer for 10 minutes. How sophisticated of a bead can you make, start to finish in 10 minutes? Bead must be in the kiln before the timer goes off.

Also, as a viewer, I suspect it would be very dull to watch someone finesse the surface of a bead for five minutes. The quest for perfection is much more entertaining to the doer than the watcher. Another thing to keep in mind. The video camera picks up the IR radiation better than the eye. This means that the bead looks much hotter on video than it does in real life. I have tried IR filters but it made the overall image too dark. I am still looking for a better solution.

Live Long, Live Crafty

Ross

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