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Safety -- Make sure you are safe!

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  #1  
Old 2013-03-12, 10:24am
veektorkbg veektorkbg is offline
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Join Date: Feb 07, 2013
Location: Saginaw, MI
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Default Easy vent hood

First posting and first thread on the site for me. I have however spent untold hours reading and educating myself here.
I needed a vent hood for my new studio but did not want a Barley Box with sides. After much debate about having one made and endless searches to find one, I came up with a plan and made one. It is not hung yet but I am very pleased with how easy and inexpensive it was. The finished size of my hood is 48"x24"x8" but they had different size ductwork to make up to a 48"x48" I think (2-24" halves put together). I used two 12"x48" to get my 24" depth. The process was extremely easy and I didn't even use the tin snips for what I have done so far, I will obviously have to use them to cut the opening for my 10" ducting. Pretty much it is just a hammer, drill, and rivet gun.

I used Menard's for my materials but they are not everywhere so I provided links to the same items at Home Depot.

Tools:
Hammer, tin snips, rivet gun, cordless drill, pliers, straight edge, sharpie, 2x4 scraps

Materials:
2-8"x12"x48" rectangular duct halves- link
4-8"x12" end caps- link
about 50 rivets
roll of aluminized tape or whatever its called

Step one:
Bend the end of the duct over to make it even with the sides. Mine was about 1/2" and was easy with pliers, hammer, and wood chunk. Do this for both ends of both pieces.

Step two:
Flatten out one edge on the short side of each end cap. This is where the two halves will overlap when assembled.

Step three:
Attach end caps by installing, drilling and riveting along the two sides. Do this for all 4 endcaps.

Step four:
On a level surface, slide both halves together forming the vent hood. Drill and rivet along the flange in the center and along the overlap in the end caps.

Step five:
Tape all seams with metal duct tape to make air tight.

Step six:
Cut duct hole with tin snips and adapt as needed for your size of ducting and fan setup. I am using 10" for mine and need to get a flange for it yet, that is why it is not cut yet.

Hope this helps to save a buck or two and shows that it is real easy to make a hood yourself.

Last edited by veektorkbg; 2013-03-12 at 10:37am.
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  #2  
Old 2013-03-12, 10:27am
veektorkbg veektorkbg is offline
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Trying to figure the pictures out now...
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Old 2013-03-12, 10:30am
veektorkbg veektorkbg is offline
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and more pics...
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Old 2013-03-12, 1:16pm
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KJohn KJohn is offline
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Thanks, that is very useful! Can you show us the duct work and fan you used too? I assume the fan is the biggest expense here.
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Old 2013-03-12, 2:10pm
veektorkbg veektorkbg is offline
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The ductwork and fan are not done as of yet. I was hoping to use 8" but I am finding that I cannot get the CFM I want without going to 10". I will update with pictures as I get it finished. I also will post pictures of the make up air setup coming through the tabletop when it is complete.
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Old 2013-03-12, 6:02pm
BeckyNoe BeckyNoe is offline
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i can't wait to see the photos...i am having a hard time picturing it in action.
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Old 2013-03-14, 9:52am
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cheng076 cheng076 is offline
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Clever use of 'found' materials. Good work; it should work just fine. Congrats.
PJH
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Old 2013-03-14, 2:32pm
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houptdavid houptdavid is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeckyNoe View Post
i can't wait to see the photos...i am having a hard time picturing it in action.
Cut a hole in it for the fan and turn it over, mount above bench
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Old 2013-03-19, 7:30am
kansassky kansassky is offline
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Brilliant idea and brilliant price!

Thanks for sharing!
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